The Myths of Tarot

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When you hear someone say the word “tarot,” what comes to mind? Usually dark, cloudy images, scary things. Coupled with superstitions, misguided thoughts and ideas, and myths, tarot has gotten a bad rap in many arenas. These myths and judgements are far from the basis of truth. I want to dispel some of these myths and misguided thoughts for you, if you’re nervous about dabbling into tarot or just curious about what it is. So, what is tarot, anyway? Tarot is an ancient art, which uses a pack of playing cards with symbols, where the reader  pulls the cards for the querent, or “one who seeks,” to answer his or her questions based on what the cards pulled represent. Yes, the cards are used for fortune-telling, but fortune telling may not be exactly what you think it is.

Tarot cards came about in 15th century Europe as a means of playing card games. It wasn’t until 300 years later, in the 18th century, that people began to use it for divination.  From Wikipedia, “like common playing cards, the tarot has four suits. Each suit has 14 cards, ten cards numbering from one (or Ace) to ten and four face cards (King, Queen, Knight, and Jack/Knave). In addition, the tarot has a separate 21-card trump suit and a single card known as the Fool. Depending on the game, the Fool may act as the top trump or may be played to avoid following suit.”

WaiteSmithCommon Myths of Tarot-

  • Tarot Reading is Evil

I want to start with this one as this is the biggest common myth. Tarot reading is not “evil,” nor is it “the devils work” or anything of the like. They are just cards, not different (literally) than the Bicycle playing cards you use for poker. There is no working with any other source, or “spirit” to assist in the reading. These are just myths to keep people in a box and not allow them to dabble in other spiritual areas, open their minds to new spiritual concepts, or raise to a higher consciousness. The only malicious thing that could possibly come from tarot is if you have a bad reader who maliciously misreads the cards to the querent. If you find an experienced, trustworthy reader, that won’t happen, and you’re in the clear of any “evil.”

  • The Tower, The Devil, and the Death card Are To Be Feared

There are no cards in the tarot to fear. They are just there to tell you what you need to hear. The death card is no way means that you will die tomorrow. The death card represents the end of something that no longer serves you, so rebirth can begin and new opportunities arise. The Devil card is a warning about too much attachment, or addictions, that need to be broken. The Tower card calls for change, and revelation. All the cards show you what you need to see, and your interpretation fits your situation. Nothing scary here.

  • Tarot Tells the Future 100%

This is a huge myth. Tarot doesn’t exactly tell the future. What Tarot does is pull cards that are relevant to the situation, and then your interpretation fits into your own situation. Tarot sheds light on subjects maybe you didn’t want to face, or couldn’t find a solution to, until you saw it in the cards. It allows you to open your mind and see things from a different perspective, and when you act upon that new perspective, you create your own future.

  • Tarot Readers Aren’t To Be Trusted

I think in any profession, any setting, you can find people who can’t be trusted, and I suppose the same is true for tarot readers. To categorize them all as untrustworthy is unfathomable. For example, I tell the querent as it is. If I pull a card that they may protest or make them uncomfortable, that is for them to deal with, but I always conduct a reading with 100% honesty, as most tarot readers do. A trustworthy tarot reader won’t play on your emotions, and will tell you exactly what the cards say, rather than what you want to hear.

I want people to understand the truth of tarot, and if you are interested in a reading, I am offering $5 dollars off any reading of 1, 3, or 6 questions. Please email me at thewildfeminine1@gmail.com to set up a reading and mention this blog post upon scheduling. 

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